Pick of the Pride: Angela Jorgenson

by Beacon Staff • April 25, 2007

For Angela Jorgensen, that philosophy has paid serious dividends.

Jorgensen, a junior pitcher for the Emerson softball team, displayed great concentration in throwing a no-hitter on April 7 in a 2-0 win over St.,Baseball and softball are known as "thinking games." Greg Maddux is a prime example of a pitcher who has proven that intelligence can be just as effective as overpowering heat.

For Angela Jorgensen, that philosophy has paid serious dividends.

Jorgensen, a junior pitcher for the Emerson softball team, displayed great concentration in throwing a no-hitter on April 7 in a 2-0 win over St. Joseph College. The feat was part of a day that featured back-to-back no-no's for the Lions, with senior Heather Drobiarz tossing the second in a 9-0 victory.

Coach Phil McElroy said that Jorgensen's calm under fire is what makes her a strong hurler.

"Angela does such a good job of putting the ball where [the opposition] can't hit it hard," said McElroy. "She does not let things bother her out there. The mental game of a pitcher is very important."

An old ballplayer superstition is for no one to mention the possibility of a no-hitter during the game. Jorgensen said the team had learned their lesson from a previous break of the unwritten rule.

"I know you're not supposed to mention it or jinx it," explained Jorgensen. "[Earlier in the season] I had a perfect game broken up when we mentioned it. This time, we didn't talk about it until it was over."

Jorgensen is no stranger to shut-outs, though the St. Joseph's win was her first no-hitter at the collegiate level.

"In high school I had a few, as well as two perfect games in mercy-rule games," said Jorgensen. "But to have my first on the college level was pretty exciting."

McElroy said he has seen a few no-hitters in his tenure at Emerson, but having two in one day was something new.

"I've never had any on back-to-back days, or even consecutive weekends," remarked McElroy. "To have two on the same day, against a team that's going to make the playoffs was special."

Jorgensen said she has been playing ball for as long as she can remember, which she estimates to be around the second grade. Growing up in Dayton, Iowa, she was introduced to the sport by her father, who was the coach of the local high school team. Ever since graduating from the tee-ball level, Jorgensen has been a pitcher.

"I always wanted to be a pitcher," Jorgensen explained. "I wanted to be the one with the ball in my hands."

After attending Southeast Western High School in Burnside, Iowa, Jorgensen enrolled in Trinity International University in Deerfield, Ill., where she spent her first two collegiate years. After her sophomore year, she decided to transfer to Emerson, where she could major in creative writing.

Jorgensen has stepped in and contributed immediately for the team, posting a 7-7 record and a sparkling 2.29 earned run average. In 16 starts, she has thrown 14 complete games, and has 62 strikeouts against only 16 walks. Jorgensen said that right from the outset, she has enjoyed being a part of the Emerson team.

"It's been a really fun experience for me," said Jorgensen. "Everyone is really fun and we all get along so well. It's also exciting to be on a winning team."

Off the field, Jorgensen makes time to serve as a staff reader for The Emerson Review and work at the Cutler Majestic Theatre. Despite keeping busy, Jorgensen has been able to manage her schedule.

"It's really just a question of scheduling," Jorgensen said. "It comes down to what you can go to and what you can miss . maybe go to class for an hour and leave. That kind of stuff."

That type of calm under pressure has helped Jorgensen to put the Lions in position to do some damage in the playoffs, and she has a positive outlook for the team's future.

"I think every team we've seen we've had the ability to beat," Jorgensen said. "It's just a question of if our mental game is going to get to us. We can't keep our heads down and let little things bother us."

If the team is anywhere close to as concentrated as Jorgensen was against St. Joseph, that shouldn't be a problem at all.