Pick of the Pride: Aman Kapur

by Beacon Staff • April 18, 2007

"You watch too much television," Kapur remembers her saying. "Go outside and play a sport."

And that's just what he did.

Kapur, who grew up in Peru, a land dominated by soccer, fell in love with tennis in his early teenage years.,It wasn't long ago thatjunior film major Aman Kapur heard the same constant nagging many other young adults hear from their mothers.

"You watch too much television," Kapur remembers her saying. "Go outside and play a sport."

And that's just what he did.

Kapur, who grew up in Peru, a land dominated by soccer, fell in love with tennis in his early teenage years.

Here at Emerson, Kapur plays both sports.

"Soccer is a main sport back in Peru," he said. "So [I played] soccer and then tennis and then I simultaneously played both. But I took tennis very seriously from when I was thirteen to about 15 or 16."

Kapur said sports were an integral part of his social life when he came to Emerson.

"My family has always been into sports, so that's why I can't live without playing sports," he said. "I've never really been homesick since I came, because being on the soccer team, I made friends from the start, and sports really helped me have a basis at Emerson."

Even if Kapur did start feeling lonely, he has his brother Varun, also a student at Emerson, to turn to.

Varun is a freshman film major like his older brother, and he also plays on the tennis team.

The elder Kapur talked about the sibling rivalry that occurs when playing sports.

"We definitely get into fights. I mean, he is my younger brother," Kapur said. "But it's fun."

While Aman has the passion to win, he says he is able to be completely relaxed when he hits the court because having fun is more important to him.

"It is serious, but at the end of the day, it's a game and it's to have fun," he said. "I just go there and enjoy every point and try to win. But I'm very relaxed."

Aman plans on going back home to Peru in May for the summer. While there, he plans on keeping up with tennis via tournaments around Lima.

But as Kapur's college career comes to to an end, he still wishes for tennis to play an integral part in his life.

"If I get an office job, before I go into the office, I'll go and play in the morning," he said. It's something I know I'll never leave because I'm happy I have the chance to play."