The Berkeley Beacon

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Modern Cinema Series


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Hellos, goodbyes, and Ghibli

Each film possesses a magical, lyrical quality and quickly proved to be the perfect bedtime story for a budding adult like myself.

The importance of film criticism

There’s something so problematic about boiling a film’s worth down to a percentage. I’ve seen plenty of objectively terrible movies that stir something in me that a number could never represent. No movie is above critical evaluation, but plenty are above a one-size-fits-all rating system.

Nominated for nothing: the unsung cinema of 2014

We shouldn’t let the narrative of this year’s films be boiled down to an essential few. As Julianne Moore said while accepting her Best Actress award last month, “There is no such thing as a ‘Best Actress.’” I fully agree with that sentiment—being the best is subjective and arbitrary.

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Atypical romance films for Valentine's Day weekend

For housebound couples looking for something different, here are five recommendations for atypical films to watch for Valentine’s Day weekend.

King of the multiplex: how to truly experience cinema

With hits like Guardians of the Galaxy and Maleficent raking in globs of money in 2014, that statistic seems surprising. But for anyone who goes to the movies on a somewhat frequent basis, it’s not shocking. Going to a movie theater is becoming an increasingly less desirable option.

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Returning to the silly and smart world of Jacques Tati

When critics and magazine columnists compile a list of the greatest film comedians, the answers are always the same: Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, the Marx Brothers, maybe Robin Williams or Bill Murray. But there’s one name you almost never see: Jacques Tati.

One man's trash: The perks of 'so bad they're good' horror movies

There’s a decidedly less spooky horror movie that holds a special place in my heart this time of year.

Bridging the Gap

Modern filmmaking has been defined by extremes. Today, movies are either self-indulgent, money-grabbing blockbusters, or pretentious, award-baiting art house films.