Solidarity at Emerson

by Beacon Staff • April 11, 2007

Unfortunately, it would seem this is often done with little concern for others in their surroundings.

Emerson's individualistic flavor is an effective way for students to become the best at what they do and make connections.,Emerson is a college for those who are here to concentrate on career goals and gaining real-life experience.

Unfortunately, it would seem this is often done with little concern for others in their surroundings.

Emerson's individualistic flavor is an effective way for students to become the best at what they do and make connections.

At the same time, could this idiosyncratic ambiance be impairing students' lives on and off campus?

Unlike the average liberal arts college, Emerson has specialized classes for very concentrated majors.

The effect of this is students are less likely to experiment with new and exciting courses in other subjects they're interested in.

The other downside is the limitation of meeting other types of people.

"TV and marketing majors seem alien to me," said senior audio major Greg Mullen. "I see them in the elevator and wonder if they go to my school. All of my friends are audio or film majors. Friends of other majors are merely circumstantial."

We go to a small school where we see many of the same people everyday. But are these walk-by friendships amounting to anything substantial?

Many of Emerson's departments intertwine in the real world. Performers, actors, writers and audio technicians are crucial to the final product of film and TV, while the marketers focus on the audience.

Then there are the political communication majors who may work in Washington, where issues of art and media censorship often arise. There are countless more examples.

Shouldn't we all be getting together now and creating not only professional relationships, but friendships as well?

The lack of solidarity extends beyond the personal. Outside of classes, Emerson has a number of great student groups such as Emerson Social Peace and Justice, Earth Emerson and Democracy Matters, but the students who participate in these groups are a minority.

By not getting involved in groups that go beyond the career path, it would appear that many students' first concerns don't extend beyond themselves. Through these groups, Emerson students can volunteer, get out into the Boston community and meet other people involved in social movements.

In turn, they can learn more about themselves, which is what college is all about.

It is crucial for students to take an interest in something beyond the field they will be entering-whether it's the environment, political movements, community action or even something a simple as their fellow Emersonians.

Without a strong sense of solidarity, how can we know what Emerson and its students stand for in the outside world?