The perpetual campaign hurts American politics

by Beacon Staff • November 28, 2007

In the midst of the presidential election, this country's most significant republican exercise, the effects of climate change have become more obvious, but have fallen from the attention of the American public.,Defying all expectation, the world is worsening as American democracy plods on.

In the midst of the presidential election, this country's most significant republican exercise, the effects of climate change have become more obvious, but have fallen from the attention of the American public. Iran has edged closer towards the possibility of being a nuclear power, despite being a signatory of the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, yet there is little substantive debate or action.

All the while, America's most effective public officials bullheadedly stick to their campaigns, isolating themselves from the nation's problems.

America is deep in debt. A majority of the military is mobilized and tied up in Iraq and Afghanistan. The current healthcare system has sunk availability and standards to the point where American infant mortality rates are higher than in communist Cuba.

From a strategic perspective, the US is facing its greatest difficulties since before the First World War. Something must be done to reverse these troublesome trends and to save America's still outstanding quality of life.

Unfortunately, given the day-to-day schedules of 21st century political characters like Democratic presidential candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, the time spent does not appear to create quality results for the American people.

Lately, Obama has wasted an excessive amount of time rubbing elbows with popular talk show host and philanthropist Oprah Winfrey in an attempt to win the Iowa primaries.

Likewise, Hillary could be doing much better things with her time than arguing to bring the troops home while dodging questions about voting to authorize war in the first place.

This is the new archetype for modern day presidential elections.

In this age of politics, candidacies are declared on "The Tonight Show," cause and solution are nothing more than buzz words and "presidential debate" means a gaggle of candidates trash talking their rivals with the lingo of Hollywood gossip monger Perez Hilton.

The American electoral process has mutated into a perverted stage show. The deformed snake of democracy has now begun to eat its own tail.

America has already been subjected to a year of baby kissing and Swift Boat Veterans-style ad hominem attacks, and in the coming year the charade will only crescendo into a larger spectacle.

If this trend continues, the eventual victor's re-election campaign will commence right after inauguration day.

If changes are to reach fruition, the public must speak out against this showboating. In order to see their elected officials spend time on the real issues, public opposition to current campaign practices needs to be expressed.

The time has come for future White House hopefuls to be enlightened: they need to pull their campaign buses off the road and get back to work.