Execution is counterproductive

by Beacon Staff • April 19, 2006

From his ambivalent look as the audiotape of Flight 93 was played to his early aim to stop his lawyers from filing motions on his behalf, the man known as the "20th hijacker" has crusaded to have the jury convict him and end his life.,Zacarias Moussaoui must not be put to death. I don't say this because I want to see capital punishment overturned, but rather because execution is what he wants. Throughout his trial, Moussaoui has practically campaigned to be put to death.

From his ambivalent look as the audiotape of Flight 93 was played to his early aim to stop his lawyers from filing motions on his behalf, the man known as the "20th hijacker" has crusaded to have the jury convict him and end his life.

Early in the trial, the terrorist sympathizer also wanted to plead guilty and ask for the death penalty. If the government is to give Moussaoui what he wants, then my faith in America's legal system will be completely evaporated. It was bad enough when OJ "The Juice" Simpson got away with murder, but to allow a man who wants to die to receive his final wish is mind-blowing.

Parents will tell you that the easiest way to punish children is not giving them what they want. Giving Moussaoui the death penalty is not a penalty; it's a present. The American government needs to wake up and realize this before it's too late. Moussaoui has readily admitted that his trial is a soapbox not for himself and his supposed crimes, but for radical Islamic fundamentalism.

Since his radical views purport the use of violence in the name of religion, especially violence that results in your own death, his eventual execution would give new inspiration to suicide bombers and fundamentalists around the world. I cannot see a valid reason why a government that wants to stop the spread of violent Islamism would allow this man to be killed.

In the end, Moussaoui will be given the prescribed fate that the jury hands down on him, but if he is to die at their hands, then it is the government and not the jury which will be stained by this prospective martyr's blood.