Paramount residents' trash irks opera house

by Alisha Parikh / Beacon Correspondent • November 3, 2016

Some residents of the dorm at the Paramount Center have taken to using their windows as garbage disposals, causing damage to the surrounding buildings.  

Paramount students received an email last Wednesday from Resident Director Matt Carney about falling trash from residents’ windows that landed on the roof of the neighboring Boston Opera House.

A piece of glass sliced through the rubber roof, Carney wrote. Glass bottles, paper, and food were also found, according to the email. Director of Housing and Residence Life Erik Muurisepp said the Opera House suspects cigarettes burned two holes in its roof.

The Opera House could not be reached for a comment.

“I am always cautious to jump to the conclusion that it is our students,” Muurisepp said. “I think that sometimes college students get a bad rap.”

He said this isn’t the first time neighboring buildings have had problems with students throwing trash out their windows. Last year, Piano Row residences received a similar email when its neighboring buildings raised concerns about the trash collecting on their roofs.

Carney’s email said that students found responsible for dropping or throwing items out the window would be subject to disciplinary action.

Director of Community Standards and Student Conduct Michael Arno said the disciplinary actions can range from a student losing their on-campus housing to a possible suspension. But these incidents don’t happen often, he said.

Paramount resident Mariana Apestegui, a freshman marketing communication major, said she felt annoyed toward the people who think throwing trash out of the window is okay.

“It’s disrespectful to the community because if we are asking them [Boston residents] to expand our campus we shouldn’t be throwing trash and making it harder for them to live their life.” Apestegui said, “They are giving all of us a reputation only some of us deserve.”

Aside from sending out an email warning, the administration doesn’t plan on searching for the students responsible for the trash throwing, Muurisepp said.

“Since this [email] went out, I haven’t heard of any other concerns,” Muurisepp said. “Hopefully, this in itself will be enough to tell people that, ‘Hey, what you’re doing, or what your guests are doing, or whoever is doing it, is impacting others.’”