Duo to create Occupy film

by Beacon Staff • October 27, 2011

strongJackie Tempera, Beacon Staff/strong

After junior Bill Blanchette read his essay about Occupy Boston aloud to his Introduction to College Writing class, he was approached by his fellow classmate Ean Ryan.

Ryan, a freshman visual and media arts major, was interested in what Blanchette, a sound design major, had to say about the protests. The two discussed the lack of participation from Emerson students in the protest, ultimately sparking the idea for a documentary film project the duo is now working on.

Ryan and Blanchette said they then pitched the idea for their documentary to Captured Emotion, an on-campus organization dedicated to documentary and non-fiction films.  Soon after the group’s approval, the duo said they got to work.

“We want to focus on the movement from a student’s perspective,” said Blanchette.

“I saw what was happening at Dewey [Square] and figured that something important was happening, and I needed to chronicle it,” said Ryan.

Ryan said he hopes to film interviews with police officers and bankers as well as students.

“We don’t want it to be biased,” said Ryan.

Since starting the project, the duo said they have completed the preliminary portion of filming. Ryan said they hope to make the documentary about 15 to 25 minutes long.

“We filmed a march on Oct. 15, we’ve interviewed people at Dewey Square, and got an unofficial tour of the site last week,” said Ryan.

In recent weeks, the protests in Dewey Square took a criminal turn when two arrests for drug distribution and complaints of graffiti said to be related to the protesters were reported to police, according to a Boston Herald article.

Twenty-one buildings around the downtown Boston area were marked with Occupy-related messages such as “Bad for America,” “Occupy,” and “Burn the Money,” said reports from the same article.

Both Ryan and Blanchette said they are big proponents of the movement and are active participants of the Occupy Emerson group. However, they both have individual reasons for creating the film.

“I think this movement will impact us socially and define a trajectory for the future,” said Blanchette. He added that he hopes to document this all through the movie.

“I’m just hoping to capture the time of the beginning and hopefully to the end,” said Ryan.

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