Harvard director replaces Rosen as vice president

by Beacon Staff • April 15, 2009

After ten years of fielding questions from journalists young and old, former Vice President of Public Affairs David Rosen has left the position and begun serving as special assistant to the president for college affairs. Rosen has been replaced by former Harvard director of communications Andrew Tiedemann, who began work on April 13.

"David Rosen will be a tough act to follow," said Tiedemann. "He has done a tremendous job.

Rosen said his new position will include providing advice and counsel to the president on various institutional issues. He will also attend meetings as a presidential representative both within Emerson and off campus, as well as representing President Jacqueline Liebergott in other capacities.

The vice president of public affairs, now known as vice president of communication and marketing, is responsible for managing a staff of eleven people and being responsible for media relations, college publications like "Emerson Today," and producing college promotional materials, including fundraising pamphlets. The person who holds this position also oversees the college Web site, plans events and serves as spokesman for the college.

"What I'll miss the most is working with the press on a day-to-day basis," said Rosen. "This includes iThe Beacon/i and JSONS. I really enjoy working with students and have done my best to be accessible and responsive."

Journalism professor Emmanuel Paraschos has worked with Rosen since he began work at Emerson and remembers the administration being less open and willing to talk to reporters during the beginning of Rosen's time at the college.

"We didn't get much cooperation," said Paraschos. "Dave was trying to be helpful, but he wasn't succeeding. But in the last two or three years, things have changed dramatically. He's been very helpful and we have nothing but praise for him."

Rosen said he will miss the administrative and financial areas of running a department the least.

Junior Diego Beruman said he interviewed Rosen several times and found him accessible and easy to talk to.

"I interviewed him a few times over e-mail and he responded immediately," the print journalism and multimedia major said.

Rosen received a bachelor of arts degree in history and government and a master's in journalism from Boston University. He has served as associate vice president for new and public relations at Harvard University and chief of staff for former lieutenant governor of Massachusetts Evelyn Murphy, among other positions. Rosen worked as a journalist for ten years at publications such as the Boston Herald (then the Record American) and Newsweek and served as State House bureau chief for United Press International before entering the field of public relations. He was also a professional pianist for thirty-five years, playing in dance bands for Bar Mitzvahs and weddings as well as serving as a soloist and band member at resorts and clubs.

Berumen believes the position of vice president for public affairs will go through a transition with Tiedemann's arrival.

"I think the role [Tiedemann] is going to be playing is way different from Rosen's," he said. "It's going to be less public affairs and more fundraisers. I know Andrew Tiedemann has a background in that."

Tiedemann held his position at Harvard for sixteen years, where he managed alumni publications, newsletters, worked on marketing campaigns, oversaw websites, and materials for college events. He previously worked as a senior editor at the office of publications at Northeastern University and as a technical writer for California Federal Savings. Tiedemann also graduated from Boston University, with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Tiedemann said Emerson appealed to him because of Emerson's goal of teaching communication and the arts.

"I was also drawn to Emerson by how passionate everyone connected to the college is about what they do and their experience here," he said. "I am looking forward to working with my Emerson colleagues to continue to explore new ways to share information with and among our various audience groups."

Rosen said he is confident that his successor will be able to meet the requirements of the position.

"He's a quick learner and I'm sure he'll do just fine," he said.