Ceremony marks official opening of bookstore

by Beacon Staff • February 14, 2007

Barnes Noble at Emerson College held an official grand opening Feb. 7 to celebrate the arrival of Emerson's first true bookstore. Students, faculty, administration and Barnes Noble management were on hand at the newest addition to Emerson's campus for a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The festivities included a book signing by local authors The Brass Sisters, snacks and refreshments, a gift-card raffle, and speeches by various Emerson administration and Barnes Noble executives.

The event kicked off at noon, with The Brass Sisters signing copies of their book Heirloom Baking and offering free samples of their homemade treats.

Students interviewed felt that the range of publications was a positive addition to the new store.

"I like that the bookstore has non-school books," said sophomore writing, literature and publishing major Anna Laurila, who did not attend the opening.

Despite these comments, there was a lack of student presence at the grand opening and some felt that the event was unimportant.

Junior WLP major Jenna Tucker said the bookstore opening seemed "kind of late" and "unnecessary."

"I thought it was pretty ridiculous," she said.

The official opening ceremony began around 2:15 p.m.

Emerson College President Jacqueline Liebergott spoke briefly about the difference between Emerson's newest bookstore and those of the past.

"I remember when we opened the bookstore in the Little Building, and I said, 'Now we have a real bookstore,'" Liebergott said. "I thought we had a real bookstore until the beginning of this semester when I walked in here, and thought, 'This is what the college deserves.'"

President Liebergott then cut the ribbon to officially open Emerson's new bookstore at 2:45 p.m.

Hil Estock, vice president of store/campus relations for Barnes Noble College Booksellers, said he was "proud and honored" to represent Barnes Noble at the grand opening.

He also talked about the excitement he has in the future of the partnernship.

According to Estock, Barnes Noble has plans to institute a Barnes Noble internship at Emerson, as well as a scholarship of $5,000 annually, according to Estock.

The event does not end the evolution of the bookstore, according to Andrew Mahoney, director of auxilary services,

"It's new to us, it's new to the community, and we're going to keep our ears to the ground and try to react to the feedback that we're getting," Mahoney said.