SGA helps lower price of printing

by Beacon Staff • March 29, 2006

Since last month, the Student Government Association (SGA) has campaigned to increase the number of print credits students receive. Black-and-white printing from library and lab computers now costs seven cents a page, down from the 10 cents it had been for more than 10 years, according to Neil Davin, Emerson's manager of technology support services.,Students may notice that the $5 they receive for print credits stretches a little further this semester.

Since last month, the Student Government Association (SGA) has campaigned to increase the number of print credits students receive. Black-and-white printing from library and lab computers now costs seven cents a page, down from the 10 cents it had been for more than 10 years, according to Neil Davin, Emerson's manager of technology support services.

This change, which came into effect on March 3, brings the number of pages students can print each semester from 50 to 71, according to SGA Vice President Samantha King.

The SGA Senate, which is comprised of class and department senators and the SGA executive board, has been working since last spring to increase the school's number of print credits.

King, a senior organizational and political communication major, and SGA President Kirstin Daniel met with Dean of Students Ronald Ludman, President Jacqueline Liebergott and Vice President for Information Technology William Gilligan on Feb. 28. King and Daniel presented their proposal, in which students would receive $66.25 in print credits each year.

This number was chosen because it was the average amount in print credits they found that students received at eight local and similar schools, King said. Unlimited printing is offered at Northeastern University, Harvard University, Emmanuel College and Boston College, four of the schools they researched.

The administrators reviewed the Senate's proposal and came to the decision to lower the price of printing instead of raising the amount of credits given, based on the fact that last year, students did not, on average, exceed the 50 prints they are currently allotted, King said.

Ludman worked with King and WLP senator Emily Patrick in the fall to help them approach the college with a proposal, he wrote in an e-mail interview. Ludman did not comment on the reason why SGA's proposal was not accepted or about why the decision was made to lower the price per sheet to seven cents.

The Senate's proposal of $66.25 would have allotted students 662.5 sheets of black and white printing annually, while the new price allows students 142 sheets each year.

"I was disappointed, yet I was also grateful that they were willing to change it [to seven cents]," King said.

Some students feel that the change is not enough to meet their printing needs.

"So many other schools like us have a much more reasonable limit to what they can use," said senior film major Thadd Williams, who has exhausted his print credits and no longer prints on campus. "The fact that they dropped the price down three cents won't really make a difference."

Students from every major would benefit from more printing, Williams said.

"Everything that we do, from essays to poems to short stories to scripts to flyers to term papers ... requires] paper," he said.

Senior film major Lee Noble, president of La