Fall in Boston: seasonal favorites

by Isabelle Lichtenstein / Beacon Correspondent • October 6, 2015

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The leaves changing in the Common signifies the start of fall.
The leaves changing in the Common signifies the start of fall.

Update Oct. 13

With the city of Boston as an autumnal playground, students are often at a loss at which of the many activities to tackle first. Among options like apple picking, leaf peeping and Halloween traditions, the city has plenty to offer.

Junior communication studies Amanda Coscia said that as soon as the leaves change color and the wind starts nipping at your cheeks, there’s nothing better to do than to explore the city. Coscia also said Halloween is a major part of the new season, and the best way to celebrate that day is to traverse to the surrounding suburbs.

“One of the best things to do is go to Beacon Hill,” Coscia said . “It’s unbelievable. There are leaves everywhere, kids are dressed up—it’s just really fun.”

There’s also the arts scene, which boasts countless forms, from dance to film. Freshman journalism major Jennifer Wood said she visits the Boston Opera House and watches the performances there every year. Fall brings about a new season of culture, and theatergoers will be able to attend a wide array of performances this time around, including Cinderella, The Third Symphony of Gustave Mahler, and Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.

“During the fall, my favorite thing to do is see The Nutcracker or one of the ballets at the Boston Opera House,” Wood said. “All of the Boston Ballet [Inc.] shows are cool to check out, even if you’re not a dancer.”

Sophomore Cornelia Bendel agreed with Wood that there is an influx of quality art during this season.

“Really great movies come out in the fall,” Bendel, a visual and media arts major, said, “There are indie theaters everywhere.”

With a number of choices for independent film houses, it’s often hard to choose which one to attend. One option is the Coolidge Corner Theatre, located on Harvard Street in Brookline. It plays all genres of film in multiple screening rooms, so there’s always something new to see. Another option is the Brattle Theatre. Located in Cambridge, it has a full showing schedule, so cinephiles are able to hop over on a whim.

Sophomore visual and media arts major Tori Hawks-Ladds also said looking into new films is a great way to usher in the upcoming awards circuit.

“It’s the beginning of Oscar season,” Hawks-Ladds said, “so all of the movies that come out are cool to check out.”

It’s also the season for spooks. With Halloween right around the corner, there are many different activities that students are able to participate in to help them get into the holiday spirit. Hawks-Ladds suggested the paranormal tours right by the school.

“I haven’t done one, but I’m always really jealous when I see people doing the ghost tours,” Hawks-Ladds said. “We live next to a cemetery, so I feel like that would be really fun.”

Some of the haunted voyages that Boston offers are the Haunted Boston Ghost Tour and Ghosts & Gravestones, both of which explore different locations in the Boston area that are said to be plagued by the supernatural.

Bendel also noted that the outskirts of Boston offer a new way to celebrate fall.

“If you go out to the suburbs, there’s lots of cool stuff, and you’re more likely to see foliage too,” Bendel said. “I try to get out of the city, maybe pick some apples, because that’s like quintessential New England.”

Bendel said, though, that regardless of what students do to celebrate the new season in Boston, the most important thing to do is appreciate their location.

“No matter what,” said Bendel, “I think you should really take advantage of the fact that you are in a city.”

 Correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly identified Jennifer Wood as Maria Wood.