66 Quint: quaint...for a man cave

by Barbara Platts / Beacon Staff • March 3, 2011

 

Xakota Espinoza, Beacon Staff

Four college dudes. Unsupervised. Allston.

You’re probably thinking beer-soaked floors, stacks of greasy pizza boxes, and horrifically squalid bathrooms.

Think again.

Turns out that despite the association between men and filth, the Emerson breed of bro can take pride in their pad... at least in comparison to most.

Senior Jared Wyso, and juniors Geoff Lopes, Ryan Garber, and Joe Rockman, all members of the Emerson baseball team, moved into their seven bedroom house on 66

[caption id="attachment_391" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Barbara Platts, Beacon Staff"][/caption]

Quint Ave in Allston last September along with Bay State College student Dustin Labbe, and University of New Hampshire Alumn Chris Collins.

The vibe of 66 Quint manages to strike a happy medium between Animal House-esque living conditions and life at home with Mom, but walking into the main room of the house the impossible-to-miss Emerson Athletics banner immediately sends a message: Man Cave.

According to the inhabitants almost every piece of furniture in the living room comes with a story. The most obvious is a red plaid couch, with mutated duct taped arm rests. It’s one of the few pieces brought from Wyso’s old apartment and the guys have developed an undeniable attachment to it.

Wyso said he found the ad for the couch on Craiglist, and decided to carry it from the sellers house on the west side of Beacon Hill to his apartment on the east side with the help of Lopes.

[caption id="attachment_392" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Barbara Platts, Beacon Staff"][/caption]

“It was the middle of summer and took the three of us about an hour;” Wyso said laughing. “It was the worst experience ever.”

Still according to the guys, the adventures of the red couch made the dilapidated thing to precious to part with. They decided to bring the it with them to Allston.

“We loved it so much that we brought it here,” said Lopes. “It’s pretty torn up, but we try and cover it with blankets -- Red Sox, of course.”

Similar in character to the couch, the coffee table is not exactly Ikea. It’s made out of a roughly six-foot-long board painted with a gold Emerson logo on a purple haze background.

According to Wyso, Emerson baseball alumni built and painted the table, and it has been passed down to members of the team for the past five years. Issues of Maxim, Men’s Health, and Baseball, lay scattered upon it.

As far as decorating goes, the guys’ technique is pretty straight forward. Sprinkled throughout the bedrooms are posters of Tom Brady, the Celtics,  the cast of Entourage, and Fight Club.

Still, 66 Quint has a homey feel. A few extra touches, like the electric fireplace in one of the bedrooms and the shag carpet in another boost ambiance, as do the white lights strung along the walls of the living room.

Lopes said this kind of attention to detail is what sets their man cave apart from homes owned by female students.

“They buy those hanging words that say stuff like, ‘Live, Laugh, Love,’” he said. “Also, they have hand towels.”

Wyso said there are also differences between the college guy’s place and the college girl’s abode when it comes to cleanliness.

“You wouldn’t find a girl with a couch this ratty,” Wyso said.

That said, in terms of hygiene, the state of the two-and-a-half baths of this man-pad defy any preconceived notions of what a bathroom shared by a group of male college athletes might look like — things could have been far more cringe worthy (however, the men did admit to having done some cleaning prior to the Beacon’s inspection).

Throughout the tour, the athletes seemed to take most pride in the kitchen, despite the fact that the fridge was sparsley stocked and contained mostly condiments, cheese and cookie dough.

“We have a dishwasher and an oven; we even have a spice rack,” said Lopes.

Cooking for themselves is only one of the many adjustments the guys have had to make since moving off campus.

“I spend $100 on groceries every two weeks, whereas going out to eat would cost almost $100 just between Monday and Wednesday,” said Lopes. “I try to cook as much as possible and make enough for everyone.”

According to Lopes, the recent transition from living on campus to a house with five guys was somewhat of a reality check.

“It’s kind of a slap in the face...you realize that you’re really on your own,” he said. “Now, if you forget to turn the lights off, it results in a $400 dollar bill at the end of the month.”

Wyso said that the 20-30 minute commute from Allston to campus every day is long, but worth it.

“Living in Allston, you get a lot more space. I lived in an apartment in Beacon Hill for two years, and it was really cramped,” he said. “The true area for guys is Allston. It has a very cool, college guy vibe.”

According to Wyso, living in Allston with a group of his teammates was a vital part of his college experience.

“There’s never a dull moment,” Wyso said.

Lopes agreed.

“If you don’t live off campus at some point, you’re missing out,” Lopes said. “Nothing compares to living in a house with your best friends.

Xakota Espinoza

Beacon Staff

Four college dudes. Unsupervised. Allston.

You’re probably thinking beer-soaked floors, stacks of greasy pizza boxes, and horrifically squalid bathrooms.

Think again.

Turns out that despite the association between men and filth, the Emerson breed of bro can take pride in their pad... at least in comparison to most.

Senior Jared Wyso, and juniors Geoff Lopes, Ryan Garber, and Joe Rockman, all members of the Emerson baseball team, moved into their seven bedroom house on 66 Quint Ave in Allston last September along with Bay State College student Dustin Labbe, and University of New Hampshire Alumn Chris Collins.

The vibe of 66 Quint manages to strike a happy medium between Animal House-esque living conditions and life at home with Mom, but walking into the main room of the house the impossible-to-miss Emerson Athletics banner immediately sends a message: Man Cave.

According to the inhabitants almost every piece of furniture in the living room comes with a story. The most obvious is a red plaid couch, with mutated duct taped arm rests. It’s one of the few pieces brought from Wyso’s old apartment and the guys have developed an undeniable attachment to it.

Wyso said he found the ad for the couch on Craiglist, and decided to carry it from the sellers house on the west side of Beacon Hill to his apartment on the east side with the help of Lopes.

“It was the middle of summer and took the three of us about an hour;” Wyso said laughing. “It was the worst experience ever.”

Still according to the guys, the adventures of the red couch made the dilapidated thing to precious to part with. They decided to bring the it with them to Allston.

“We loved it so much that we brought it here,” said Lopes. “It’s pretty torn up, but we try and cover it with blankets -- Red Sox, of course.”

Similar in character to the couch, the coffee table is not exactly Ikea. It’s made out of a roughly six-foot-long board painted with a gold Emerson logo on a purple haze background.

According to Wyso, Emerson baseball alumni built and painted the table, and it has been passed down to members of the team for the past five years. Issues of Maxim, Men’s Health, and Baseball, lay scattered upon it.

As far as decorating goes, the guys’ technique is pretty straight forward. Sprinkled throughout the bedrooms are posters of Tom Brady, the Celtics,  the cast of Entourage, and Fight Club.

Still, 66 Quint has a homey feel. A few extra touches, like the electric fireplace in one of the bedrooms and the shag carpet in another boost ambiance, as do the white lights strung along the walls of the living room.

Lopes said this kind of attention to detail is what sets their man cave apart from homes owned by female students.

“They buy those hanging words that say stuff like, ‘Live, Laugh, Love,’” he said. “Also, they have hand towels.”

Wyso said there are also differences between the college guy’s place and the college girl’s abode when it comes to cleanliness.

“You wouldn’t find a girl with a couch this ratty,” Wyso said.

That said, in terms of hygiene, the state of the two-and-a-half baths of this man-pad defy any preconceived notions of what a bathroom shared by a group of male college athletes might look like — things could have been far more cringe worthy (however, the men did admit to having done some cleaning prior to the Beacon’s inspection).

Throughout the tour, the athletes seemed to take most pride in the kitchen, despite the fact that the fridge was sparsley stocked and contained mostly condiments, cheese and cookie dough.

“We have a dishwasher and an oven; we even have a spice rack,” said Lopes.

Cooking for themselves is only one of the many adjustments the guys have had to make since moving off campus.

“I spend $100 on groceries every two weeks, whereas going out to eat would cost almost $100 just between Monday and Wednesday,” said Lopes. “I try to cook as much as possible and make enough for everyone.”

According to Lopes, the recent transition from living on campus to a house with five guys was somewhat of a reality check.

“It’s kind of a slap in the face...you realize that you’re really on your own,” he said. “Now, if you forget to turn the lights off, it results in a $400 dollar bill at the end of the month.”

Wyso said that the 20-30 minute commute from Allston to campus every day is long, but worth it.

“Living in Allston, you get a lot more space. I lived in an apartment in Beacon Hill for two years, and it was really cramped,” he said. “The true area for guys is Allston. It has a very cool, college guy vibe.”

According to Wyso, living in Allston with a group of his teammates was a vital part of his college experience.

“There’s never a dull moment,” Wyso said.

Lopes agreed.

“If you don’t live off campus at some point, you’re missing out,” Lopes said. “Nothing compares to living in a house with your best friends.