Say what? Slogging through the street slang

by Beacon Staff • September 30, 2009

these days is a mish-mash of horse hockey and malarkey that whacks people right out of their skulls. We all have our little funky-butt words and phrases and it's groovy when we don't abuse them.

But, when we do, it's balls-to-the-wall mad crazy.,People say some weird stuff. Conversation

these days is a mish-mash of horse hockey and malarkey that whacks people right out of their skulls. We all have our little funky-butt words and phrases and it's groovy when we don't abuse them.

But, when we do, it's balls-to-the-wall mad crazy.

I asked dozens of Emerson students last week about their day-to-day play-say. I could have gone all snoop-style and listened

in on people's conversations, but that felt a little "sketch" and would have taken forevs. So I asked them upfront: "What are some weird words, phrases and slang things you actually use on a regular basis?"

I got the top-of-the-head stuff pretty fast: hella, awesome sauce, totes inapropro.

But some people felt put on the spot and needed a few minutes to think.

"Sometimes I say fart nuggets."

Thank you Michael Allen, junior marketing

communication major, that was worth the wait.

Others had words they mostly keep to themselves. Senior film production major Billy Palumbo finds "ballsagna" is best kept under his breath. So does his girlfriend.

And some tidbits came from where I least expected, like when a lady at the Sept. 23 Emerson volunteer fair told me not to be a "shuggy."

After a few days of talking with everyone

who would listen, I had a list of over 100 bass-akwards things students say today at Emerson College. But for all the different words we be using, it's obvi we be saying the same things.

For example, "good" is not good enough here. Some of us need more explosive adjectives to show our satisfaction.

When I go to Boloco, I expect a dynamite dinner. Their burritos are bangin,' and smoothies are the bomb-dot-com.

We're loaded with adjectives like "money," or nouns like "dime-piece." Our vintage outfits even match our vocabulary: "groovy," "hip" and "tight."

Cool beans are hot stuff and being an Emerson Lion is dandy. My Vespa is clutch. The T isn't diesel. And nothing says "irony" like celebrating all things sick, nasty and dank.

Bad things don't work for us, like that one class you hate; it's broke, busted and the professor has a major malfunction.

Wherever we are, we let some crazy interjections fly.

"Oh my ducking quack" is appropriate

when returning a camera to the EDC and you realize you left the forking lense cap at home.

It's also notable that, at a school that promotes clear communication, we have people walking around saying "frij-a-fraj," "fiddlee dee," and "crapazulu." And can we please have another round of applause for "ballsagna?" During downtime, some people head to the Common to "dink" or "futz." I prefer to "futz," myself. I've also been known to scooter poot, but that's none of your business.

Like anything, there are exceptions to the all-slang-is-synonymous rule.

(Womp womp).

On the real, how else do you tell a girl she looks like a snooker cue? No matter what, she'll next you in a hot second and that'd be absurdly abused.

We are a silly-spoken bunch here; bringing spin-ovation to the co-groovications

and the arts. The most props go to all the civilians who helped a brother get this joneser doneski.

I'll plant you now and dig you later. Until then, watch your mouth.