Paper is golden at Harpers Ferry

by Beacon Staff • March 1, 2006

There appears to be no trace of the regular hipster crowd; the groups of guys in girls' jeans and women wearing Vans slip-on shoes that make up a large portion of Boston's most notorious student neighborhood are vacant from the streets of Allston.,It's a Thursday night in Allston, but something seems amiss.

There appears to be no trace of the regular hipster crowd; the groups of guys in girls' jeans and women wearing Vans slip-on shoes that make up a large portion of Boston's most notorious student neighborhood are vacant from the streets of Allston.

To the average Allston resident, the disappearance of these kids may be an enigma, but to those who follow Boston's nightlife scene, a quick walk down Brighton Avenue to Harpers Ferry is all it takes to find these regulars in various poses on the dance floor at the weekly dance-concert-party known as Paper.

Since the Thursday night event began at Harpers Ferry on Jan. 5, Paper has quickly become one of the most popular attractions in Allston for those not interested in keg parties on nearby Linden Street.

Fliers for the night encourage people to "become a local celebrity," advice taken to heart as evidenced by the activities of Paper regulars once the club begins to fill to capacity around 11 p.m.

A quick tour at this hour will reveal hundreds of sweaty, Urban Outfitters-clad kids clamoring for space on the dance floor, spilling Miller High Life on each other and yelling over the noise of some dance-rock band you've never heard of but swear sounds familiar.

Plain-clothes bouncers can be seen removing rowdy hardcore kids or girls with fake IDs from the club, and a trip to the men's bathroom will reveal stalls occasionally occupied by more than one person.

Decadence aside, Emersonians comprise a good number of Paper attendees, with more students being turned on to it every week.

"It's getting really crazy now," sophomore TV/video major Braden Wheeler said. "I can't sit in the dining hall Thursday afternoon without at least five people asking me if I'm going to Paper."

Junior audio/radio major and Paper regular Anastasia Traitses said she enjoys the event.

"It's a fun place to go and dance at when there's nothing else to do on a Thursday night," she said.

Andrew Riker, promoter and creator of the Paper, said Paper has become a huge success. He says that the name Paper reflects a sense of "money and importance; two syllables that are easy to remember and flow off the tongue."