The Berkeley Beacon

Thursday, March 23, 2017

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Students designs device to keep kids safe

About 17 years ago, a regular day at the beach took an abrupt turn when 3-year-old Sierra Ducey found herself lost and completely panicked. Luckily, a man pointed her to the lifeguard who then returned her to her father. For Ducey, now a junior marketing communication major, this experience became the inspiration behind her current entrepreneurial project, Kids Positioning System, or KiPS, a geographic tracking device that enables parents to track their kids’ locations.

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Bites with Becca: Let them eat cake

This one doesn’t start in the kitchen. It’s around 1 a.m. and the room is dark. My partner and I’s eyes are glued to the television, desperate to know who’s about to be the winner of a Shrek-themed episode of Cake Wars. It’s the third episode we have watched that night, and alas, I sleep through the final round.

LGBTQ Column: Sexuality through literature’s lens

Growing up queer is lonely. One must learn to live with solitude. For me, the only chance I have at being understood is in the pages of a novel.

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Q&A: Dana Morgan, lawyer and pageant champ

Emerson alumna Dana Morgan’s dreams didn’t always focus on a courtroom. Instead, she dreamed of a crown. Although she recently formed her own law firm centered on issues related to immigration, Morgan grew up idolizing beauty pageant contestants and hoping to be one.

Fashion fosters activism

With fashion week coming to an end, what stands out the most to me, besides the fact that Christopher Kane still sends Crocs onto the runway, are the moments when designers used their prominence to make a statement about human rights, whether subtle or grandiose.

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Students raise awareness for mental illness

College is filled with important papers and tests that can leave students feeling overwhelmed and stressed out. Project WOW, a fair aimed at promoting mental health awareness, is a safe place for people to let off steam through performance art.

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Finding power through postcards

Last week, a variety of students filled the Iwasaki Library’s CoLab. This wasn’t a quiet study session. Instead, these students were intent on making their voices heard.

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Emerson bloggers shine in cyber spotlight

Lifestyle blogging is more than just putting your life on the internet for fun. It is now a real platform for people to express themselves and their opinions.

#AskJackie: Good Vibes

Anonymous asks: I'm thinking about getting a vibrator but I've never been with a boy intimately. I’m worried that getting a vibrator will ruin the first time that I'm with a boy. What should I do?

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"She persisted." He put it on a shirt

Late on the evening of Feb. 7, Matt Rudinski, ‘12, was scrolling through his Twitter feed. On this seemingly quiet night, Rudinski found an uproar. Liberals were angry, and they had a new rallying cry. And Rudinski decided he had a role to play. “Nevertheless, she persisted.”

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Students use finstas to find privacy

It all began with a photo of her friend, a playful quip about the Emerson soccer team, and a declaration that she wouldn’t post again. One day later, she broke that promise.

Students party for Planned Parenthood

When President Trump was elected in November, most of Emerson was quiet. The mix of confusion, anger, and sadness brought a somber silence that permeated campus. However, it didn’t last long.

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Bites with Becca: Cooking with love

Around Valentine’s Day, the question of whether to dine out or dine in with a date is seemingly inevitable. To really crank that romance, and to save a couple dolla doos, the best restaurant is your kitchen. The immense pressure to spend money on a significant other—because somehow that translates to love—is ridiculous. Love is homegrown, so why not cook at home?

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Knitting for those in need

Giuliana Hazelwood first learned how to knit in elementary school. It wasn’t taught at her school, so she asked her teacher to train her. Now, it serves as a form of meditation. Knitting helps her shut off her brain. She can knit every night before going to bed when she is dedicated to a specific project.