The Berkeley Beacon

Sunday, September 24, 2017

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Students embrace "guerrilla art"

“You don’t need money to create theater, you just need a space that exists already,” Harmer said.

Songs We're Thankful For

No matter how different all these songs might be, if they’re on the list it's because we’re thankful they exist.

Reading Between the Lines: Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden

What makes this story such a quintessential melodrama is both the nature of the characters and the fact that none of them are what they initially seem.

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Cultures come together, share rhythms

"I think [the event] is important because Emerson is so lacking in diversity." —Sophomore Christopher Streat

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Expression necessary to evolution: Emerson community members respond to election with art

"Any kind of art form really helps people express their bottled-up emotions, and it also gives the opportunity for us to learn." ­—Junior Madeleine Derveloy

“This world is bullshit”; finding inspiration in Fiona Apple’s fearless attitude

It is in emotion that Fiona Apple finds strength.

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Alum doc follows young blind woman, explores beauty

“People don’t seem to see people with disabilities as being sexual, and, trust me, I am,” Smith said.

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Elma Lewis Center asks “What America Will Be”

All of the panelists expressed hope in the future and the ability of the American people—particularly younger generations—to enact change.

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Feminist website editors tackle gender with new satirical book

"We get to portray things in a way that women are thinking about in their day-to-day lives." ­—Beth Newell, co-founder of Reductress

Promising debut novel Homegoing covers generations of stories

Reading Homegoing feels less like you’re experiencing the novel’s plot with the characters so much as it feels like you’re floating above them—dipping into their lives when their personal narratives have reached a turning point and then dipping back out to view their family lineage from a bird’s eye view.

Songs of Halloween: A playlist by the Berkeley Beacon staff

Too spooky.

New Netflix series dismantles hip-hop stereotypes

Rap music, disco, race, gangs, young love, and really short shorts are all featured in Netflix’s new series The Get Down. The show tells the eccentric tale of the birth of hip-hop in the South Bronx in the late ‘70s. The concept was created by Baz Luhrmann, who has won multiple awards for his work on Moulin Rouge! and The Great Gatsby.

Panel picks apart humor in presidential election

To some, this election is a joke. For others, they joke about the election for a living. Last Friday, six comedy, politics, and communications professionals gathered for a panel moderated by associate professor Gregory Payne in the Bill Bordy Theater. The event was sponsored by the School of the Arts and the Center for Comedic Arts.

Small Screen Halloween: The Exorcist poorly reimagined

It was only a matter of time before it was adapted into a mediocre TV show on FOX.

Alumni web series tells Quick and Dirty sex stories

The series explores bisexual relationships, infidelity, and STDs—all topics typically left out in mainstream media.