The Berkeley Beacon

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Reconsidering the sacred cows of rock 'n' roll

Instead of chastising Kanye fans for riffing on their hero worship, maybe it’s time to start demanding more from the so-called “Cute Beatle.”

Thumb_140_1423113555-img_3932.jpg

Comedy troupe stays grounded, gets laughs at first show of semester

Last week’s show included anti-gardening riots, a woman who lives off of bottled oxygen in a Lorax-like world, and a serial assassin that specializes in chopping off fingers.

Thumb_140_1423113103-img_9914.jpg

Writing about writers: Emerson professor Miranda Banks discusses new book on Writer's Guild

"The more I learned about the history of the guild, the more fascinated I became."

Thumb_140_1423113046-image1.jpg

Out of print, out of mind: Director screens documentary about revival theater still projecting celluloid

“There is a wonderful romance element to projection booths, and to the light coming from the booth and to shadows on the screen.”

Students learn visual effect tricks behind Birdman, The Equalizer

“I attended the presentation to gain a larger appreciation of what goes into visual effects when making a movie,” Kirkman-Moriarty said. “The amount of work and the amount of results that they can achieve with visual effects today [is] really jawdropping.”

Why Poe Matters: Examining the legacy and longevity of a misunderstood writer

Poe was also the first 19th-century American writer that I read as a child, and almost everyone who went to public school will have probably encountered “The Raven,” “The Tell-Tale Heart,” or “The Masque of the Red Death,” among other classics. Yet the nature of Poe’s legacy has always been a matter of dispute. Of course his influence on genre fiction cannot be overstated; he is one of the prime progenitors of the detective story and the adventure story.

Thumb_140_1422490909-band-groupshot__evan_walsh_s_conflicted_copy_2015-01-28_.jpg

The Freshmen Four: New students form folk band Ben Mueller and the Low Ceilings

“It’s hard to dislike that kind of music,” said Mueller. “Intense music doesn’t make me feel as happy.”

Thumb_140_1422313083-moviepicks.jpg

What to watch during the snow day

Nothing warms a snowed-in college student like the warm glow of a television. Here are The Berkeley Beacon’s picks for the best way to spend your day off.

King of the multiplex: how to truly experience cinema

With hits like Guardians of the Galaxy and Maleficent raking in globs of money in 2014, that statistic seems surprising. But for anyone who goes to the movies on a somewhat frequent basis, it’s not shocking. Going to a movie theater is becoming an increasingly less desirable option.

Thumb_140_1421896495-alejandro_adams_01202015_0002.jpg

Morbid curiosity: Student filmmaker turns fear of death into art

Junior Alejandro Peña is afraid of death. Truly afraid; he said he can’t fly without being heavily medicated and gets anxious just watching the news. Yet with his latest film, death has become his muse.

Norman Lear speaks from experience

After changing the face of television in the ’70s through iconic shows like All in the Family, The Jeffersons and Good Times, Norman Lear recently released his latest creative endeavor: his new memoir, Even This I Get to Experience.

Band of broken dreams

For a brief period, I was Watertown Middle School’s biggest Green Day fan. But 2004’s American Idiot came out while I was in seventh grade, and I couldn’t get into it. Its mock-political premise was different from the snotty pop-punk Green Day, the band I initially fell in love with. The inherent schmaltz of ubiquitous radio smash “Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” didn’t sit well with my budding music identity.

Memory: 'a great wonder of human existence'

Poetry, as the great 20th century poet Robert Hayden once said, remains a mysterious thing, and our increasingly pragmatic and fast-paced world is often lacking in mystery. When I encounter a truly great poem, I feel that I am in the presence of something larger than myself.

Thumb_140_1416460718-carrie_adams_111914._0003.jpg

The power of passionate poetry

Carrie Rudzinski took a notebook to her senior prom. She took a notebook to a friend’s wedding. She takes a notebook with her everywhere.

Thumb_140_1416460673-james_thegiantpeach_reynoso_11162014_0002.jpg

Even when life isn’t peachy, play tells kids, ‘you’re not alone’

Sophomore Michael Levine, the play's director, said he wanted the show to provide hope for kids who may be struggling with their lives at home.