Trailer Park

by Beacon Staff • March 18, 2009

bi17 Again/i/b

Is it terrible to pray that Zac Efron's first post-iHigh School Musical/i studio film, i17 Again/i, fails in every possible way? Though, from the looks of its trailer, it looks passably funny and engaging, I can't help but hope that this self-involved pretty boy will someday soon fall out of favor with even the most die-hard of his ever-expanding tween-based fan group. But who knows, maybe the WildCats' star basketball player will prove himself more than a cashmaking Disney-channel commodity. His co-stars, Matthew Perry and Leslie Mann, are, after all, gifted comedians and their charming, likeable personalities could help soften up his stiff, Ken-doll persona.

But then again, we're talking about Zac Efron here. The guy who belts synthesized pop like a lame iAmerican Idol/i reject. Yeah, I hope his new movie sucks. i-HV/i

biPublic Enemies/i/b

Let us take a moment to thank the cinematic gods for putting Johnny Depp in a role that does not involve gobs of make-up and strange, alien-sounding voices (e.g. iPirates of the Caribbean/i, iCharlie and the Chocolate Factory/i, iSweeney Todd/i). In his newest film, which is directed by the kinetic, brilliant Michael Mann (iCollateral/i, iHeat/i), Depp stars as the infamous bank-robber John Dillinger.

With brisk pacing and a sharp, desaturated Depression-era look, iPublic Enemies/i appears poised to bring together a plethora of different styles and talent. Not only will Christian Bale and the recent Oscar winner Marion Cotillard co-star, but Mann, famous for being an action film connoisseur, will surely bring plenty of wit and intelligence to the much-anticipated project. i-HV/i

biFunny People/b/i

Judd Apatow has just wrapped up his third film, iFunny People/i, and judging by the trailer, this new comedy, starring Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen and Leslie Mann, looks like a possible departure from his more childish i40 Year Old Virgin/i and iKnocked Up/i.

The story, about a famed comedian (Sandler) who may or may not be dying of cancer, seems to focus less on grown men acting like perverted children, and more on actual adult relationships and "big people" issues, like extramarital affairs and mortality.

Then again, Rogen still spews out lines like, "I'm so Jewish, my face looks like a circumsized penis." Still, there's a sobriety to iFunny People/i that makes me think that Apatow could very well be returning to his more dramatically-inclined iFreaks and Geeks/i days. i-HV/i

ibAngels and Demons/i/b

In iThe Da Vinci Code/i, we had the mysteriously beautiful Audrey Tautou to entertain us from, well, from the rest of the movie. But she isn't in iAngels and Demons/i. So what can we expect from the prequel?

Loud, high-pitched music and clunky, discombobulated direction from the continuously by-the-books Ron Howard (why he's directing this prequel after his first film received terrible reviews just shows how committed he is to pretty paychecks).

Outside of that, Tom Hanks makes no promises in a dull lead role that acts more like a moment-to-moment narrator then an actual human being. i-CG/i

ibManagement/i/b

The iManagement/i trailer promises a romantic comedy about two men fighting over Jennifer Aniston-truly a shocking concept there. Who wouldn't want her? (Brad Pitt aside.) Steve Zahn plays a needy guy trying to get a girl, Woody Harrelson steps in as the jerk ex-boyfriend who steals her away and Aniston poignantly portrays "indecisive" and "dumbstruck," the Aniston staples. Picture a surreal indie flick where nothing makes sense. Not this movie. The good guy will likely win, but not before skydiving into a swimming pool, wearing a floral, baby blue bathrobe and generally proving that being a wimp is hotter than being Woody Harrelson. The perfect film for one in search of a warm fuzzy feeling that will surely induce either dopey sighs or vomiting. i-TG/i